Pronunciation

I have (mostly) standardized orthography across my constructed languages so that once a person knows what the sounds are in one of them, le has a good grasp of the rest. The heavy use of diacritics is so that there isn’t ambiguity in how things are pronounced. I played the flute growing up, and the way I learned the International Phonetic Alphabet relies heavily on my understanding of fingering charts and musical notation.

Some of the digraphs are holdovers from before I discovered unicode. I also don’t like putting diacritics over h and other tall letters because they end up looking pretty weird.

 

ķ, ţ, ş, ḑ
palatalized consonant

ė
articulated schwa (end of word)

ȧ, ė, ȯ, u̇
articulated vowel (do not diphthong)

ä, æ̈, œ̈, ë, ị̈, ï, ö, ü
breathy vowel (think Ancient Greek)

ā, ē, ī, ō, ū
long vowels


short i, as in “pitch”

short u, as in “uh”

å
pronounce “thought” British-style

ć
ch, as in “chair”

c

voiceless palatal affricate

k

an ejective that is nearly a click
sometimes actually /k/


glottal stop (that sound in the hyphen in uh-oh)

ñ
enye

kh
French r

hj/sj

voiced palatal fricative (a y with buzz), the IPA /ʝ/
sometimes IPA /ɣ/ as an allophone

x

voiceless velar fricative (/x/)
sometimes voiceless palatal fricative (/ç/) as an allophone